Tag Archives: social media

I DON’T ALWAYS…

Meme based on the Most Interesting Man in the World character. Text: I don't always make memes. But when I do, I use the damn spell check.

The (former) most interesting man in the world gives sage advice. Image made by Rhea with memegenerator.net.

To find out more, attend my workshop:

How to Not Totally Embarrass Yourself on Social Media

Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015

8 – 9 p.m.

Your desk, Anywhere, USA

^^ This has been another post scrutable only to students in ENG 370: Multimedia Composition. Regular RSS subscribers, please ignore and go back to your regularly-scheduled Web-based procrastination ^^

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Thanks for a great Fair!

Cross-posted from DC State Fair

Thank you to everyone who came out today to celebrate DC talent at the DC State Fair in the heart of the Barracks Row Fall Festival. And congratulations to the winners of all 19 contests!

Want to relive the day or catch up on the events? Our fourth annual Fair is all over social media — both in words and pictures. Take your pick:

A special thank you goes out to our contest coordinators, judges, and volunteers. You made it all possible!

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What we talk about when we talk about 9/11

Where were you front page

This week, I asked my first-year college students where they were on September 11, 2001. I found myself in some good and varied discussions. One of the discussions got me thinking about communication, then and now. An interpreter (stepping out of her role at the request of curious students) recalled a friend who interpreted the live TV news for deaf employees where she worked when the closed captions went garbled. That was a memorable job. The front page of the September 12 Washington Post featured tweets with the hashtag #wherewereyou, a combination of smooshedtogether punctuation and phrasing that would have meant little to anyone 12 years ago.* Now half a billion Twitter users around the world could recognize it and regularly share their thoughts using that convention.

The Post introduced its lead story with the reminder: “First-graders on Sept. 11, 2001, are college freshmen now.” Yes, indeed. But it turns out six-year-olds see and remember more than I would have guessed, and 18-year-olds’ thoughts run deeper than the next kegger. Continue reading

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